Where Do You Need To File And How Do You Know?

Gray Areas In Family Court

                Having the proper knowledge to tackle your custody or visitation case in order to be more useful to your case, as opposed to not knowing anything about the laws, statutes and rights you may or may not possess, is a top priority for parents going through the family legal process over their children. However it is quite common, especially in today’s fast moving, commuter based social economy, for people’s cases to involve multiple states. Merely knowing what rights you have to your kids in the state you live in may not be enough in this kind of situation. It is also common for jurisdictions, what is recognized by the courts and what rights a mother or father can or cannot take advantage of, will contradict the other states laws and policies regarding family law. This can not only complicate the matter, but add a tremendous dollar value to your case due to travel costs, multiple court fees and possibly attorney’s fees. If you find yourself in this situation, there are many ways you can help yourself and still get things going in the right direction.

Figure It Out. If you don’t know anything about your state’s laws or anything in general about family law, it might be a good idea to check out a few websites or legal textbooks to familiarize yourself with the basic in’s and out’s of child custody or divorce law. A good place to start is Google. A quick internet search should at least narrow down what you need to be searching for. For example, anything from “Texas custody and divorce statutes” to “family law in Texas”, or whatever state or states are involved, should get you started; usually the websites on the first page have higher traffic than others and will yield information that a lot of people have found to be useful. A trip down to your local library, county court house or university library is a great place to research hard copies of specific jurisdictional law and records of past cases to compare to your own and gain potential insight.

Above all else, your decision needs to be one that reflects what is in the best interest of the child. Without getting too heady about the meaning of what good really is, it can be said outright that the judge’s decision will most definitely include physical, monetary and psychological factors in your life and the child’s life. What this means is that it wouldn’t make sense to ask for full custody of the child if you are unemployed and not living in the best of conditions if the other parent has a steady job and a more suitable home for the child. Speaking with a legal professional with intimate knowledge of parental state rights is a great way to know what you should or should not do. It is possible however, with enough research, to find the answers to your questions without paying the high costs of attorney fees. There are many statewide advocate groups and online legal resources to assist you with your case and help you win custody of your children.

 www.AboutTheChildren.org

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Posted in Child Custody, Courtroom Preparation, Family Court
4 comments on “Where Do You Need To File And How Do You Know?
  1. […] Where Do You Need To File And How Do You Know? (aboutthechildrenblog.com) […]

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