What Do As A Teen Parent Seeking Custody Or Visitation Of Your Child

What To Do If You’re A Younger Parent

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Topics such as child custody, visitation or divorce are often discussed under the assumption that we’re talking about adults of legal age. There are a lot of new parents that are just starting to go through a family legal situation that are under the age of eighteen though. While the number of teen pregnancies has gone down over the years, young parents are still out there and they need to know what their rights are and what to do about their children, especially if they are worried about the other parent making the situation more troublesome. Often times the families of the parents will get involved in an effort to do what they think is right, which makes an already complicated situation, more complicated. If you’re a minor with a child, born or unborn, or a parent of a minor that is becoming a new parent, here is some information that might help you with your family legal issue.

  • Taking The Plunge. Parents that are under age and have decided to the keep the child need to know what they can do about establishing and enforcing their rights to the child. It’s not uncommon for a mother with a new born to want to put the baby up for adoption and have the father of the child, or their own parents, stepping into the situation to get custody of the baby in order to take care of it and raise the child rather than adopt it out. One of the first things you should think about, if you’re the father or your kid is the father, is establishing paternity of the child. Mothers don’t have to do this for obvious reasons but as a father, you need positive proof that the child shares your DNA. Once this is established, getting custody or visitation rights is a little easier.
  • The Right Stuff. Finding legal assistance as a parent that’s under age can be difficult. A lot of advocacy groups are going to require a parent or guardian to be present in order to help the underage parent. It’s not unheard of for some of these new parents to have their own families against them in their decision to keep the child. In situations where minors have to submit to their parents, seeking emancipation can come into the mix as a means of getting out from underneath their parents’ going against what they want. This is a long and difficult path that is not always successful. In short, the circumstances need to be just right in order for the court to grant emancipation to an individual. This requires some inquiry to your local courts and/or attorneys that can provide the information necessary for this course of action.

Resources for parents in these kinds of situations can be scarce and it can seem like the situation is impossible to resolve. If you decide to go in front of the judge to resolve the issue between you and the other parent, with or without the help of either of the families, having as much information to use in your case as possible is what will tip the odds in your favor. The key to winning these kinds of cases is to show with conviction that you are looking out for the best interests of the child. This is what the judge will always take into consideration when determining what should be done with the child if there is a dispute regarding custody, visitation, adoption or any of the other issues that are prevalent in family law.

Read more at –> www.AboutTheChildren.org

1 (800) 787-4981

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Posted in A Childs Best Interests, Child Custody, Child Visitation, Children, Family Court, Parenting Tips, Paternity, Single Parenting
2 comments on “What Do As A Teen Parent Seeking Custody Or Visitation Of Your Child
  1. Stolen innocence 2012 of United Wheeldom says:

    Reblogged this on stoleninnocence2012's Blog.

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