How To Improve Your Chances Of Winning Your Court Case In Family Law

Improving Your Odds In The Court Room

images

            A lot of parents going through the family court process start by calling around asking for legal advice or some kind of assistance for their family legal issue if they don’t know where to start. One of the most common questions asked by parents fighting for custody or visitation of their children has to do with their chances of winning their case. While no case is going to be the same due to the unique circumstances of each individual case, there are some blanket statements to be made about what the best course of action is for starting a family law case or what to do and what to expect, in general, when fighting for custody of your child. Here are some tips if you’re a parent starting a court case in family law.

  • The More You Know… A good thing to remember is that information is what you need more than legal advice. Talking to attorney and having them give you legal advice can certainly help you but this can be costly and not necessarily give you what you need to win your case. What you need is a court order signed by a judge and the right documents to file with the court. If you’re just starting out on the road to custody, gathering as much information about how to best be prepared when walking into the court room, what you can expect during your case and other information relevant to family law can improve your chances of winning custody of your kids tenfold. Knowing the difference between legal and physical custody, definitions of legal terms that could hang you up during your hearing and things like that will not only prepare you for the coming battle but it also shows the judge that you took the time to know your stuff in order to get the best possible outcome for your child.
  • What Are You Fighting For? The question appears to be an obvious one, you’re fighting for your children. However, the deeper aspect of this question pertains to what specific parenting schedule, form of custody or visitation or guardianship that you’re petitioning the court for or responding to what you were served with. If what you’re asking for isn’t reasonable and has not taken into account the aspects of the child’s life, your relationship with them, or your ex’s relationship with them, and is simply an aggressive response to your ex wife or husband, the judge will be able to spot it from a mile away. If you haven’t seen your child in awhile, or don’t really have a solid relationship with them and then all of a sudden come out of nowhere and petition for full custody, what you’re asking for and what the circumstances of the case are, don’t necessarily warrant immediate switch of custody. The point is this, be sensible about what you’re asking for and why you’re asking for it.

Custody battles shouldn’t be about winning or losing. What’s important is that your child gets the best possible outcome from the case as you can give them. If that means that you they don’t spend as much time as you’d like with them, then it’s for the greater good. Family court is all about the greater good in regards to the family as a whole and the fact that your children are still growing up, still developing as a person and need guidance and the support they need to achieve their full potential. This is the goal of every parent.

Get started at –> www.AboutTheChildren.org

1 (800) 787-4981

Advertisements
Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in A Childs Best Interests, Child Custody, Child Visitation, Children, Courtroom Preparation, Family Court, Joint Custody, Parenting Plans, Single Parenting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Popular Topics

Click to follow your blog and receive helpful parenting & court prep posts by email.

Join 11,184 other followers