What You Can Do About Stress In Family Law

Behind Enemy Lines

Frustrated Woman at Computer With Stack of Paper

A lot of the parents that call us looking for assistance with their family legal issue feel like they’ve been backed into a corner and don’t know what to do. In these situations, it’s really easy to be impulsive and not make the right choices or say the wrong things; people act like scared wild animals when they feel that their back is to the wall and they’re running out of options. Fear causes people to do and say things they wouldn’t under normal circumstances. So I thought today would be a great day to lay out a couple strategies that can help you deal with your own stress that can be associated with family legal situations because we’re all human and sharing our experiences helps us learn and adapt to the world around us.

  • Find The Epicenter. Often times an inward search of ourselves yields a lot of information about the current state of things. Stress can be a defeating thing if you’re trying to hold it together to work towards a goal, such as establishing custody or visitation rights for your children. It may seem redundant to ask why you feel angry in a family legal situation but pin pointing the source of your frustration might shed some light on the situation as a whole; this can be a lot like meditation, which is also great for reducing stress. This requires you to set aside the emotion of anger itself for a moment and figure out what’s really going on. For example, if you’re staring down the barrel of single fatherhood and you’re mad at your ex, is it because you feel like she stabbed you in the back? Or maybe because you feel like she’s asking for too much money out of all this. Once you peel these layers away, you might find that the reason you’re upset isn’t as big as you thought it was and it will be easier to focus on the task at hand.
  • Just The Facts. Dismissing emotion isn’t the goal here because we’re not robots. However, it is important to be able to lay out the facts of the case because in family law, that’s what’s important. Presenting the judge with accusations that can’t be backed up or including name calling and slander in your argument to win your case, might in fact harm your case. Having things like voicemails, emails, receipts, documented cases of abuse (verbal or physical) or anything like that are what hold ground in the court room. If you’re unsure about what is admissible or not, do a little research or ask a legal professional that can give you advice on that particular subject. Obviously you don’t want to incur costs where you don’t need to but sometimes it takes a little help from someone who spent six years or more learning the trade to get on the right track to establish your rights to your children.

The bottom line here folks is that family law is a very specific business and every case requires a different strategy because not all family legal cases are alike. They ‘re all similar in the fact that they have to do with parents and their children but not all custody cases are battles, not all divorces are clean and simple and the circumstances of one parent seeking custody over the other are always going to be different. Do some research before you start your case and get the advice you need to properly represent yourself or get the representation you need to handle your case in family court.

Read more at –> www.AboutTheChildren.org

1 (800) 787-4981

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Posted in Child Custody, Children, Family, Family Court, Fathers Rights, Joint Custody, Parenting Tips, Single Parenting

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